Carisoprodol/aspirin/codeine (By mouth)

Introduction

Aspirin (AS-pir-in), Carisoprodol (kar-eye-soe-PROE-dol), Codeine (KOE-deen)

Treats muscle pain and stiffness. This medicine is a combination of muscle relaxant, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) and a narcotic pain reliever.

Brand Name(s)

There may be other brand names for this medicine.

Soma Compound w/Codeine

When This Medicine Should Not Be Used

You should not use this medicine if you have had an allergic reaction (including asthma) to carisoprodol, meprobamate, codeine, aspirin, or nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as Motrin®, Advil®, Nuprin®, or Tolectin®. You should not use this medicine if you are pregnant or breastfeeding. You should not use this medicine if you have a history of bleeding disorders, porphyria (an enzyme problem), stomach or bowel problems (such as blockage, bleeding), or active stomach ulcers.

How to Use This Medicine

Tablet

  • Your doctor will tell you how much of this medicine to use and how often. Do not use more medicine or use it more often than your doctor tells you to.
  • It is best to take this medicine with food or milk.
  • Drink plenty of fluids to help avoid constipation.
  • This medicine is not for long-term use. This medicine should only be used for 2 to 3 weeks.

If a dose is missed:

  • If you miss a dose or forget to use your medicine, use it as soon as you can. If it is almost time for your next dose, wait until then to use the medicine and skip the missed dose. Do not use extra medicine to make up for a missed dose.

How to Store and Dispose of This Medicine

  • Store the medicine in a closed container at room temperature, away from heat, moisture, and direct light.
  • Ask your pharmacist, doctor, or health caregiver about the best way to dispose of any leftover medicine after you have finished your treatment. You will also need to throw away old medicine after the expiration date has passed.
  • Keep all medicine away from children and never share your medicine with anyone.

Drugs and Foods to Avoid

Ask your doctor or pharmacist before using any other medicine, including over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products.

  • Make sure your doctor knows if you are also using St. John's wort, fluvoxamine (Luvox®), omeprazole (Prilosec®), or rifampin (Rifadin®, Rimactane®). Tell your doctor if you are also using medicine to lower blood pressure (such as atenolol, enalapril, hydrochlorothiazide [HCTZ], lisinopril, metoprolol, quinapril, Accupril®, Cozaar®, Diovan®, Lotrel®, Toprol®, or Zestril®), pain or arthritis medicine called "NSAID" (such as ibuprofen, Aleve®, Celebrex®, or Motrin®), insulin, or diabetes medicine that you take by mouth (such as glipizide, glyburide, tolbutamide, or Glucotrol®).
  • Make sure your doctor knows if you are also using acetazolamide (Diamox®), methotrexate (Folex®, Rheumatrex®), blood thinners (such as clopidogrel, heparin, warfarin, or Coumadin®), a steroid medicine (such as dexamethasone, prednisolone, prednisone, or Medrol®), or an MAO inhibitors (MAOI) such as Marplan®, Nardil®, or Parnate®.
  • Make sure your doctor knows if you are also using probenecid (Benemid®), sulfinpyrazone (Anturane®), or antacid or stomach medicine including ranitidine, sucralfate, Carafate®, Pepcid®, Tagamet®, or Zantac®.
  • Do not drink alcohol while you are using this medicine.
  • Tell your doctor if you are using any medicines that make you sleepy. These include sleeping pills, cold and allergy medicine, narcotic pain relievers, and sedatives.

Warnings While Using This Medicine

  • Using this medicine while you are pregnant can harm your unborn baby. Use an effective form of birth control to keep from getting pregnant. If you think you have become pregnant while using the medicine, tell your doctor right away.
  • Make sure your doctor knows if you have kidney disease, liver disease, asthma, diabetes, heart disease, low blood pressure, pancreas problems, or seizures. Tell your doctor if you have lung disease (such as COPD), brain tumors, or head injuries. Tell your doctor if you have a history of drug abuse or dependence.
  • Aspirin should not be given to children or teenagers with chickenpox or flu symptoms unless approved by your child's doctor.
  • This medicine may be habit-forming. If you feel that the medicine is not working as well, do not use more than your prescribed dose. Call your doctor for instructions.
  • This medicine may make you dizzy or drowsy. Avoid driving, using machines, or doing anything else that could be dangerous if you are not alert.
  • This medicine may cause constipation. This is more common if you use it for a long time. Ask your doctor if you should also use a laxative to prevent and treat constipation.
  • When a mother is breastfeeding and takes codeine, there is a very small chance that this medicine could cause serious side effects in the baby. This is because codeine works differently in a few women, so their breast milk contains too much medicine. If you take codeine, be alert for these signs of overdose in your nursing baby: sleeping more than usual, trouble breastfeeding, trouble breathing, or being limp and weak. Call the baby's doctor right away if you think there is a problem. If you cannot talk to the doctor, take the baby to the emergency room or call 911.
  • This medicine may cause bleeding in your stomach or intestines. This problem can happen without warning signs. This is more likely if you have had a stomach ulcer in the past, if you drink alcohol regularly, if you are over 60 years of age, are in poor health, or are using certain other medicines (such as a blood thinner or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medicine [NSAIDs]).
  • This medicine may also cause a serious type of allergic reaction called anaphylaxis. Although this is rare, it may occur more often in patients who are allergic to aspirin or to any of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Anaphylaxis can be life-threatening and requires immediate medical attention. The most serious signs of this reaction are very fast or irregular breathing, gasping for breath, wheezing, or fainting. Other signs may include changes in color of the skin of the face; very fast but irregular heartbeat or pulse; hive-like swellings on the skin; and puffiness or swellings of the eyelids or around the eyes. If these effects occur, get emergency help at once.
  • Dizziness, lightheadedness, or even fainting may occur when you get up suddenly from a lying or sitting position. Getting up slowly may help lessen this problem. Also, lying down for a while may relieve dizziness or lightheadedness.
  • Do not stop using this medicine suddenly without asking your doctor. You may need to slowly decrease your dose before stopping it completely.
  • If your symptoms do not improve or if they get worse, call your doctor. Do not use the medicine for more than 2 to 3 weeks (14 to 21 days) to treat pain unless your doctor has told you to.

Possible Side Effects While Using This Medicine

Call your doctor right away if you notice any of these side effects:

  • Allergic reaction: Itching or hives, swelling in your face or hands, swelling or tingling in your mouth or throat, chest tightness, trouble breathing.
  • Blood in your urine.
  • Bloody or black, tarry stools.
  • Blue lips, fingernails, or skin.
  • Fast, pounding, or uneven heartbeat.
  • Fever, chills, cough, sore throat, and body aches.
  • Itching or swelling.
  • Lightheadedness, dizziness, or fainting.
  • Ringing in the ears.
  • Seizures.
  • Severe drowsiness.
  • Shortness of breath or troubled breathing.
  • Slow heartbeat.
  • Sudden and severe stomach pain.
  • Vomiting blood or something that looks like coffee grounds.
  • Weight loss.
  • Yellowing of your skin or the whites of your eyes.

If you notice these less serious side effects, talk with your doctor:

  • Hiccups.
  • Nausea, vomiting, constipation, heartburn, or stomach cramps.
  • Skin rash.

If you notice other side effects that you think are caused by this medicine, tell your doctor

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088

Review Date: 2011-02-04 Reviewed By: Keywords: ,
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