Liraglutide (Injection)

Introduction

Liraglutide (lir-a-GLOO-tide)

Used to treat type 2 diabetes. This medicine is used together with proper diet and exercise to help control your blood sugar.

Brand Name(s)

There may be other brand names for this medicine.

Victoza

When This Medicine Should Not Be Used

You should not use this medicine if you have had an allergic reaction to liraglutide, or if you have a family history of medullary thyroid cancer or a condition called Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia syndrome type 2 (MEN 2). You should not use this medicine if you have diabetic ketoacidosis (ketones in the blood) or type I diabetes.

How to Use This Medicine

Injectable

  • Your doctor will prescribe your exact dose and tell you how often it should be given. This medicine is given as a shot under your skin. This medicine is given as a shot under the skin of your stomach, thighs, or upper arms.
  • You may be taught how to give your medicine at home. Make sure you understand all instructions before giving yourself an injection. Do not use more medicine or use it more often than your doctor tells you to.
  • Do not use this medicine if it looks cloudy or has changed color.
  • You will be shown the body areas where this shot can be given. Use a different body area each time you give yourself a shot. Keep track of where you give each shot to make sure you rotate body areas.
  • Use a new needle and syringe each time you inject your medicine.
  • Follow carefully the special meal plan your doctor gave you. This is the most important part of controlling your condition, and is necessary if the medicine is to work properly. Also, exercise regularly and test for sugar in your blood or urine as directed.
  • This medicine should come with a Medication Guide. Read and follow these instructions carefully. Ask your doctor or pharmacist if you have any questions. Ask your pharmacist for the Medication Guide if you do not have one. Your doctor might ask you to sign some forms to show that you understand this information.

If a dose is missed:

  • Call your doctor or pharmacist for instructions.

How to Store and Dispose of This Medicine

  • Store your new, unused medicine pen in the refrigerator, in the original carton, and protect it from light. Do not freeze this medicine, and do not use the medicine if it has been frozen. You may store the opened medicine pen in the refrigerator or at room temperature for 30 days. Throw away any unused medicine after 30 days.
  • Remove the needle from the pen before storing the medicine. This prevents leaking of the remaining medicine and prevents air bubbles from forming in the pen.
  • Ask your pharmacist, doctor, or health caregiver about the best way to dispose of any leftover medicine, containers, and other supplies. You will also need to throw away old medicine after the expiration date has passed.
  • Throw away used needles in a hard, closed container that the needles cannot poke through. Keep this container away from children and pets.
  • Keep all medicine away from children and never share your medicine with anyone.

Drugs and Foods to Avoid

Ask your doctor or pharmacist before using any other medicine, including over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products.

  • Make sure your doctor knows if you are also using diabetes medicines that you take by mouth such as chlorpropamide, glimepiride, glipizide, glyburide, tolbutamide, Diabeta®, Glucotrol®, or Orinase®.

Warnings While Using This Medicine

  • Make sure your doctor knows if you are pregnant or breastfeeding, or if you have kidney disease, liver disease, gallstones, any kind of infection, or a history of pancreas problems. Tell your doctor if you have a condition called gastroparesis, which causes your stomach to empty more slowly than usual.
  • Check with your doctor right away if you have the following symptoms while using this medicine: a mass in the neck, difficulty with swallowing, hoarseness, shortness of breath, troubled breathing, or wheezing. These may be symptoms of a serious thyroid problem.
  • Pancreatitis may occur while you are using this medicine. Tell your doctor right away if you have sudden and severe stomach pain, chills, constipation, nausea, vomiting, fever, or lightheadedness.
  • If your blood sugar gets too low, you may feel weak, drowsy, confused, anxious, or very hungry. You may also sweat, shake, or have blurred vision, a fast heartbeat, or a headache that will not go away. If you have symptoms of low blood sugar (hypoglycemia), check your blood sugar. If your blood sugar is 70 mg/dL (milligrams per deciliter) or below, do one of the following: Drink 4 ounces (one-half cup) of fruit juice, or eat 5 to 6 pieces of hard candy, or take 2 to 3 glucose tablets. Recheck your blood sugar 15 minutes later. If your blood sugar goes above 70 mg/dL, eat a snack or a meal. If your blood sugar is still below 70 mg/dL, drink one-half cup juice, or eat 5 to 6 pieces of candy, or take 2 to 3 glucose tablets. Carry candy or some type of sugar with you at all times, especially if you are away from home. You can take this if you feel that your blood sugar is too low, even if you do not have a blood glucose meter. Always carefully follow your doctor's instructions about how to treat your low blood sugar. Learn what to do if your blood sugar gets too low. Teach friends, coworkers, and family members what they can do to help if you have low blood sugar.
  • Never share medicine pens with others under any circumstances. It is not safe for one pen to be used for more than one person. Sharing needles or pens can result in transmission of infection.
  • Your doctor will need to check your blood or urine at regular visits while you are using this medicine. Be sure to keep all appointments.
  • This medicine is only part of a complete program for controlling diabetes. You can also help yourself through diet, exercise, and checking your blood sugar.

Possible Side Effects While Using This Medicine

Call your doctor right away if you notice any of these side effects:

  • Allergic reaction: Itching or hives, swelling in your face or hands, swelling or tingling in your mouth or throat, chest tightness, trouble breathing.
  • Blurred vision or slurred speech.
  • Change in how much or how often you urinate, or painful or burning urination.
  • Difficulty with swallowing.
  • Fever, chills, cough, sore throat, and body aches.
  • Shortness of breath or troubled breathing.
  • Sudden and severe stomach pain, nausea, vomiting, fever, and lightheadedness.
  • Unusual tiredness or weakness.

If you notice these less serious side effects, talk with your doctor:

  • Diarrhea, constipation, or upset stomach.
  • Dizziness or headache.
  • Loss of appetite.
  • Redness, itching, swelling, or any changes in your skin where the shot was given.
  • Runny or stuffy nose.

If you notice other side effects that you think are caused by this medicine, tell your doctor

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088

Review Date: 2011-02-04 Reviewed By: Keywords: ,
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